Data Viz | Politics

REPRESENTING US: which house members Support impeachment?

 
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi takes the stage at the California Democratic Party's state convention in San Francisco in June 2019.    Photo:    Gage Skidmore    via    Flickr    (Creative Commons license)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi takes the stage at the California Democratic Party's state convention in San Francisco in June 2019.

Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr (Creative Commons license)

Note: Since these data visualizations were first published, Rep. Mark Amodei (R-Nev.) told The Nevada Independent that he wanted to “let the committees get to work and see where it goes,” but that he would not vote to impeach the president. Given the equivocal nature of his comments, his district is not highlighted in the first visualization.

Visualizations and graphs updated October 10, 2019, 5 pm CDT.

On Sept. 24, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) announced that she supported opening an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, officially beginning the next chapter in her party’s months-long saga to exact Congressional oversight on the White House.

Pelosi’s announcement came days after the Washington Post first reported a whistleblower complaint from within the intelligence community, which detailed an “urgent concern” regarding a phone call between the president and a foreign leader.

Since that first story broke, numerous media reports described the phone call in question as a conversation with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in which Trump asked Zelensky to help investigate Joe Biden and his activities in Ukraine when Biden was vice president.

Those reports were largely confirmed by a memorandum released by the White House that documented Trump’s conversation with Zelensky. Congress later released an unclassified version of the whistleblower complaint.

Since Pelosi’s announcement, all but seven remaining House Democrats have publicly joined the call for an impeachment inquiry.

Explore more about those undecided House Democrats and their districts using our interactive tools below.


    Who supports impeachment? Who doesn’t?

    While nearly every Democrat has joined the House Speaker in her call to initiate impeachment proceedings, a handful remain equivocal.

    Hover over each district in the map above to see which Democrats support impeachment, which Democrats don’t and how their districts voted in the 2016 presidential election.

    And take a closer look at the Democrats who do not currently support impeachment below.

    How close was the last House race among those Democrats who do not support impeachment?


    Who are the Democrats who publicly endorsed impeachment since September?

    Democratic calls to impeach grew louder over summer, but the speed by which Democrats publicly announced their support for opening those proceedings accelerated dramatically after Congress returned from its August recess.

    Hover above each House district in the map above to see which Democrats announced their support for impeachment since September and read the list below.

    How close was the last House race among those Democrats who offered support for impeachment since September?


    The elephant in the room: Congressional Republicans mostly resist Pelosi’s call for impeachment

     
    U.S. Congressman Justin Amash (I-Mich.) left the Republican Party in July 2019 over concerns about Trump’s conduct in office.    Photo:    Gage Skidmore    via    Flickr    (Creative Commons license)

    U.S. Congressman Justin Amash (I-Mich.) left the Republican Party in July 2019 over concerns about Trump’s conduct in office.

    Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr (Creative Commons license)

     

    Republican members of Congress have remained largely supportive of the president, and when the House adjourned for its October recess, only one GOP House member said that he was open to seeing an investigation proceed.

    Rep. Mark Amodei (R-Nev.) told the Nevada Independent that the relevant committees should investigate and then make a decision. Amodei represents Nevada’s 2nd District is the only Republican from that state’s Congressional delegation.

    Another exception is Rep. Justin Amash (I-Mich.), who was elected as a Republican but left the party in July over concerns about the Trump’s conduct in office. Amash is currently the only independent serving in the House.

    The GOP caucus in the House finds itself in a precarious situation: It lost its majority by more than 40 seats in the 2018 midterm elections. Hover over each district on the map below to see which House districts flipped from red to blue in the map below.

    And explore the margins of victory for each house race in the interactive graph below.

    Finally, check out what each district’s support was for either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.


    Notes about use

    On social media, please use the hashtag #RepresentingUS. Users may freely use data and images from this page. Please include the following citation and link. Source: APM Research Lab, “Representing US, 2019.” Available at: apmresearchlab.org/representingus.

    You may also wish to see our second release of our Representing US tools (pre-election content including candidate data and demographic and economic data by district) or our first release of Representing US tools in our Tableau gallery. Please email us at info@apmresearchlab.org with any additional questions about these tools.

    How to navigate these tools

    On map views, use + or – (in the toolbar along the left side of any map view) or your mouse scroll wheel to zoom in and out. You may also click the magnifying glass icon and enter a location to zoom to it. Use the cross-shaped tool to pan and move about, including locating data for Hawaii or Alaska.

    Click the home icon or refresh your browser page to reset the view. All bar graphs and tables may be sorted (high-to-low, low-to-high, or alphabetically) by clicking the sort icon (three stacked bars).

    Click here if you do not know your U.S. House district to locate it by your zip code, or use the magnifying glass icon on the map views to identify district(s) associated with a zip code, city, state, or other geography.

    Data sources and notes

    The 2018 election results were sourced from the New York Times ’ 2018 coverage. (D) refers to Democrat, (R) refers to Republican, (I) refers to independent, (L) refers to Libertarian, and (G) refers to the Green party.

    In the case of formerly vacant U.S. House seats, the party which last held the seat is used to determine who held or flipped the seat for the map titled “Which U.S. House seats were held or flipped by each party?”

    Uncontested 2018 races as well as same-party races (e.g., Democrat vs. Democrats) are represented as 100% blue or red in the “How close was the U.S. House race?” bar graph and the “How red or blue was the outcome of 2018 midterm election?” map. In the case of a Democrat or Republican defeating a third party candidate, the respective margin of victory is shown as a percentage red or blue in the latter map.

    Data on Trump/Clinton margin in 2016 by U.S. House district sourced from Cook Political Report’s Partisan Voting Index by state and district, which uses data collected by POLIDATA. Further methodology can be found in the full Report by Cook. Data on 2016 U.S. House election results (and subsequent special elections) sourced from CNN, Politico, the New York Times, and states’ Secretary of State offices.

    In some cases, margins of victory may differ slightly from the gap between candidates’ vote shares, due to rounding from figures with greater precision.